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01 March 2010

God, that's chilling.
posted by Specklet 01 March | 05:46
particularly the fact that there was a patch availible:

"For several years now, Airbus has offered its customers a special safety program - called "Buss" -- at a cost of 300,000 per aircraft. If the airspeed indicator fails, this software shows pilots the angle at which they must point the plane.

Up to now, Air France has chosen not to invest in this optional extra for its fleet."



posted by Wilder 01 March | 06:43
I think that I would prefer to remain ignorant up until the very moment that my body gets instantly shredded.
posted by danf 01 March | 11:16
To this day, the relevant licensing bodies still only test pitot tubes down to temperatures of minus 40 degrees Celsius (minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit) and an altitude of about 9,000 meters (30,000 feet). These completely antiquated specifications date back to 1947 -- before the introduction of jet planes.

what
posted by dhartung 01 March | 11:43
at a cost of 300,000 per aircraft.

I wonder how that compares to the loss of a plane (and the associated costs--e.g. bad publicity)
posted by Obscure Reference 01 March | 11:52
So part of the problem was they didn't have enough fuel to move around the storms. Couldn't they have descended to a lower altitude so the ice would melt?
posted by kirkaracha 01 March | 12:08
Terrifying.

According to his kerosene calculations, he has to climb far further, to above 11 kilometers, where the thin air reduces his fuel consumption.

His hands seemed to be tied. I also wonder how quickly ice would thaw even if he tried to fly lower.
posted by justgary 01 March | 13:11
Wait a minute! || Radio in a moment.

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